Spread the word, help make the fuckers tremble

6 08 2011

The following post was made by a Bahraini activists online.

I have only minute to speak here as I am at an internet cafe I must use now to post, but I have a request of the good bloggers here – one which I ask upon my hands and knees begging you with all hope and humility.

Please do not forget about us in Bahrain.

I beg of you to not abandon your heart passion, but please do not forget about us here.

Our own freedom struggle is bad now, it has taken many turns for the worse and getting more worse.  The secret police are out in full force and anyone who has ever uttered any support of the freedom movement is now at risk.

Please support us, we must have people like you to help us.  We must have people like you to ask your  the governments to help us please have the basic dignity which we give our blood for.

We are going to the streets again, with nothing but our lives and bodies and we know it will be bad for us but we do not care.  We are united we are one, we are Bahrain!

It is brother and sister, sunni and shi’ite – do not believe the lies it is an Iranian plot or must be done for the oil or stability.  We do not have the internet, it is too blocked.  We do not have the media, it is too controlled.  We only have YOU!

Help us, I beg you with all my heart and soul.

FREE BAHRAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I will not give any details in order to prevent any useful information leaking out which may help the person be identified, but for anyone who has ever valued freedom, it is our duty to repeat this message as far and as widely as possible.  The Bahraini’s need our support and the Anarchists should be ready to give that support to a people in revolt.





Protests against the Defence Industry Expo (D.I.E) called

11 06 2011

So those that know anything about South Australia will know that the Premier Mike Rann has been trying to brand the state “Australia’s Defence State” or something along those lines.  In short, we’re the place that builds the stuff our government uses to blow other parts of the world up.  Kudos to us.

Anyway.

Protests have been called for the 28th against an expo being put on by the Defence Industry to pimp their explosives to a series of international partners.  Adelaide Indymedia has published this background info for those interested:

According to the Defence Industry Expo’s own website: (www.defenceandindustry.gov.au) the Australian Government plans to replace 80 percent of its “war fighting” assets by 2020. This constitutes an “investment” of $150bn of taxpayers money.

While they brand this as “Defence” spending, the Australian Defence Force (ADF) has been fighting US wars that have nothing to do with the “defence” of Australia and its people.

In South Australia, tens of millions of dollars have been spent by the Rann Government to attract military industries to set up shop.

Weapons manufacturers will be concentrated in a walled precinct beside the Port River. Powerful US weapons manufacturers are even involved in “partnerships” with local public schools.

Is this how we imagined our future?

Left Unity has other ideas. We think taxpayers money should be spent on the creation of renewable industries and essential services like health, education, public transport and the like.

Why are thousands of public sector jobs being cut and services slashed while millions are being spent on the manufacture of weapons that are ultimately used to kill people in other parts of the world?

These weapons are being bought to help shore up the self-interested global military strategy of the United States. This course has caused people around the world, including Australians, needless suffering and loss in places like Korea, Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan.

It’s time we said No! to the “Defence State”.

You can find the facebook event page here.





Straight out of Libya

18 02 2011

Straight out of Libya, powerful video of demonstrators gathering to voice their opposition to Gaddafi.

Care of Cyrenaican, posting on the LibyanYouthMovement’s Twitter, @ShababLibya





Kicked out of a demonstration in Torronto for highlighting women’s issues

4 02 2011

While Egyptians have been defying their government by taking to the streets for over a week now, a demonstrators gathering in solidarity held in Toronto, Canada has shown their commitment to progress by reportedly kicking out a woman raising awareness of women’s issues in Egypt.

Reddit user eatenplacenta posted the following,

I made a sign about female genital mutilation and violence against women and people started getting in my face and yelling at me about how my message had no connection to the protest (although it was a protest about oppression in Egypt and the need for better human rights) and that FGM doesn’t exist anymore in Egypt. Men and women were trying to push me away and someone broke my sign. Then someone else complained about me to the director of the protest and he told me that if I didn’t take down my sign, he would kick me out of the protest and I asked him why and his response was “today isn’t about women.” There was an area for the fucking Iraqi Communist Party but to bring up a women’s rights issue was bad enough to piss off a lot of people and get kicked out. Women have been completely marginalized in this revolution. It was disheartening and only proved that the fact that I needed to be there because it was so controversial.

This was the sign.

The Egyptian uprising, by most accounts I’ve read at least, has united people from all corners of Egypt to stand opposed to Mubarak and the thugs which have spent the last few nights attacking pro-democracy supporters.

Gatherings of people within Tahrir Square have enabled people to interact who would never have had the opportunity to do so only months before while allowing political messages to be discussed.

A woman calling who called into the @Jan25 Voices twitter feed described the protests in Tahrir square as classless and genderless.

Before this, a video began circulating on the internet of a young woman leading protesters in a chant against security forces as they stood only a metre away behind a fence.

A feature by Al Jazeera tells details of a night spent skirmishing with pro-government supporters in and around Tahrir square.

The closer I got, the more frenetic the activity among the anti-government protesters.

Men and women hustled up huge bags of rocks. Another group dragged a metal barricade into a new backup position.

The source of the cacophony that had been echoing off Cairo’s streets and through our window was revealed: protesters behind the lines were rhythmically banging on the metal pavement fences in a primal drumbeat to keep the crowd’s spirits up.

All accounts point to women being involved on the front lines in the uprising.

Not being Egyptian and not being in Egypt, I cannot give any detailed description about what is being discussed by protesters on the street, or whether they will be discussed over the next weeks.

However, from the reports coming out of Egypt out over the last few days, protesters have clearly been dealing with the very immediate threats posed by the Egyptian police, and that posed by violent thugs supporting the regime.

Given the circumstances, it is unlikely that those on the streets have given much thought to anything other the immediate future, food, sleep and how to respond to the antagonists of the regime.

The men and women of Egypt have shown exceptional courage in standing up to Egyptian authority’s and their supporters, after all, there is a lot at stake.

If Mubarak wins, and some are suggesting that he already has, there will be a crack down.  Not only will the people in the street face repression, but, no doubt, their family’s will suffer a similar fate.

That fate will not be pleasant as the Egyptian police and prosecutors are known to torture those they have arrested.

Already organisers of the protests have been arrested as well as a notable Egyptian blogger who reportedly has managed to escape custody to go “on the run”.

It may be possible that those in Toronto misinterpreted eatenplacenta’s motives for appearing at the demonstration with the sign, given the propensity for those inciting Islamophobia to cite Female Genital Mutilation as a key reason why “all Arabs are evil”.

But ignorance is no defence.

Ejecting eatenplacenta for attempting to highlight a serious issue relating to women in Egypt betrays the spirit of the uprising itself given the role women  have played so far and the relatively egalitarian environment it has created.

Repeatedly, protesters have stated that they are fighting to create the potential for dialogue to take place without fear of reprisals.

Given that the people of liberal Toronto, Canada are not facing an immediate, day-to-day threat to their safety either from the regime or the regime’s supporters for speaking out, it is a place where discussion of issues such as Female Genital Mutilation can, should and must take place.

So long as one girl suffers, the discussion and action on the issue must take place and raising these issues, where ever possible is necessary to ensure the discussion continues.

Any act which silences that discussion runs contrary to the stated goals and aspirations which the Egyptian people are fighting and dying for.

To what extent the Egyptians engage with these issues when they are not fighting for their lives will define what is currently taking place within Egypt.

Perhaps it will be a distinguishing feature between a mere uprising and the beginnings of a real revolution.





Iran

21 06 2009

Iran.  Everybody’s talking about Iran.

The mainstream media are up in arms, political demonstrations are being held in cities around the world in solidarity to the protesters, and you can just tell politicos are bursting with the urge to throw their support behind the protest movement — so long as they’re after democracy.

If it isn’t the Iranians ingenious use of twitter to get the word out, or their daring in demanding democracy from a government that has been made out to be the devil over the last decade, the subject of Iran has been slapped on the front page of newspapers throughout the world.

I’m not complaining.  The images of Iranians taking to the streets to protest their government are inspiring, but there are some horrible truths stirring in the background.  The C4SS has already pointed out that politicians hate change, and while Obama and other politicians have express their support for the mass in Iran, the silence from most political leaders has been deafening;

It’s also interesting to watch the reactions of politicians elsewhere. Incipient revolution, regardless of its ideological content or where it takes place, gives politicians the willies. It keeps them up nights, or else causes them to bolt awake with the irresistible urge to make sure the world outside their windows still believes it needs them.

From the perspective of a man in Obama’s line of work, the worst of all possible outcomes is the “failed state” — a state where the political class experiences “loss of physical control of its territory or a monopoly on the legitimate [sic] use of force.” Such a situation is always pregnant with possibility: The possibility that the dying state will be replaced, even temporarily and provisionally, by something other than a new state.

Six days a week and twice on Sunday, a Barack Obama will support any state — liberal democracy, communist dictatorship, Islamist theocracy, doesn’t matter — if the plausible alternative is no state. After all, if one country can manage itself without overhead in the form of his counterparts, people are bound to notice, and next thing you know he might find himself looking for real work instead of running a successful franchise of the Big Con.

While the “leaders” of other states might be willing to accommodate, might even wish for or be willing to tentatively support, a more “liberal” regime in Iran, they’ll stand shoulder to shoulder with Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the mullahs if they foresee any risk at all that Iranians might take their lives into their own hands and dispense with the state altogether, even if only for a day.

Change, true change, scares politicians.  If you can find a better, more successful method of doing something, such as looking after your daily life without outsourcing most of the thinking to an old man a few thousand kilometres away, then you don’t need them.  But still, this observation, while totally apt, doesn’t seem to be quite right given the coverage Iran has received in the media.  One could be forgiven for believing that there was nothing else worth reporting, another point which has been made elsewhere;

Iran, Iran, Iran. You would think this was the only news in the world. Odd isn’t it?

What is so unique about unrest in Iran? Isn’t there unrest everywhere? Sure there is!
Aren’t there protests everywhere?
Yup, there are!
Look at the G-20 protests. The coverage that was given served to portray the protestors in a negative light and law enforcement as doing their job to keep the peace. Even when the death of an innocent bystander resulted, Ian Tomlinson at the hands of head bashing police officers, the main stream media stayed quite quiet. Apologies I stand corrected, quiet, except for the smear campaign that was launched against the victim after the police brutality was exposed! Apparently, Ian Tomlinson liked to drink. As if that justified his murder at the hands of law enforcement…

In Iran, it is a different story.
The police trying to control some extremely unruly crowds are portrayed as ruthless and “videos of police beating demonstrators hit hard at the emotions”
Unusual for western media to be sympathetic to unruly protestors.

If protesting is legitimate in Iran for an election, it surely should be at the G-20 protests, when issues affecting the world populace are being discussed and decided upon by elites behind locked gates. Gates that ensure the masses are left out in the cold.
But if the G-20 protests aren’t relevant in your mind.
Let us look at another country. Georgia.
There have been many protests there.
Did you know that? Most people don’t.
Why is that? Well there hasn’t been much western mainstream media coverage of it. Certainly not the wall to wall, 24/7, coverage Iran has garnered.
Yet, in Georgia on June 15th/09, guess what was going on?
Protests! Along with police beatings!

To add to the author’s posts, let me also point out that Greek Anarchists have been in struggle since last the shooting of a 15 year old boy against the Golden Dawn, the riot police that they work with and attempts by the Greek government to conduct a pogrom of immigrants inside Athens.  Shock horror!  Nationalist groups seek racial purity inside the birthplace of democracy and all that is good and holy?  Surely that would make a great story, one of passion, struggle and deliverance.

Sadly, no.  And the only thing to be said about the affair so far is that a while back some terrorist groups shot a cop.  Hell, even the Gold Dawn fascists have been described as ‘Right-Wing Anarchists’ in the media on occasion.

I don’t want to appear as if I’m engaging in conspiracy theories, but might all this have something to do with Iran not particularly malleable when it comes to American and Western interests?  Perhaps its easier to foment rebellion and destabilise the country than saddle up to go to war for the first time in a new presidency, particularly if North Korea keeps playing up and bullets start flying in that region.








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