Spread the word, help make the fuckers tremble

6 08 2011

The following post was made by a Bahraini activists online.

I have only minute to speak here as I am at an internet cafe I must use now to post, but I have a request of the good bloggers here – one which I ask upon my hands and knees begging you with all hope and humility.

Please do not forget about us in Bahrain.

I beg of you to not abandon your heart passion, but please do not forget about us here.

Our own freedom struggle is bad now, it has taken many turns for the worse and getting more worse.  The secret police are out in full force and anyone who has ever uttered any support of the freedom movement is now at risk.

Please support us, we must have people like you to help us.  We must have people like you to ask your  the governments to help us please have the basic dignity which we give our blood for.

We are going to the streets again, with nothing but our lives and bodies and we know it will be bad for us but we do not care.  We are united we are one, we are Bahrain!

It is brother and sister, sunni and shi’ite – do not believe the lies it is an Iranian plot or must be done for the oil or stability.  We do not have the internet, it is too blocked.  We do not have the media, it is too controlled.  We only have YOU!

Help us, I beg you with all my heart and soul.

FREE BAHRAIN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I will not give any details in order to prevent any useful information leaking out which may help the person be identified, but for anyone who has ever valued freedom, it is our duty to repeat this message as far and as widely as possible.  The Bahraini’s need our support and the Anarchists should be ready to give that support to a people in revolt.





Bahraini activists face brutal repression

28 04 2011

This just in from the BBC

Hundreds of people have been detained for taking part in protests, many unable to communicate with family.

The seven defendants were reportedly tried behind closed doors on charges of premeditated murder of government employees – allegedly running two police officers over in a car.

They pleaded not guilty to the charges, reports said.

The trial was the first publicly announced since the Gulf state was put under martial law in mid-March.

Who’s got odds that the charges have been falsified to give a legal veneer to the proceedings and an excuse to execute some “meddlesome kids”?

Al Jazeera has some more details…

The seven defendants were tried behind closed doors on charges of premeditated murder of government employees, which their lawyers have denied.

A Shia opposition official named those sentenced to death as Ali Abdullah Hasan, Qasim Hassan Mattar, Saeed Abdul Jalil Saeed, and Abdul Aziz Abdullah Ibrahim.

He told the AFP news agency that Issa Abdullah Kazem, Sadiq Ali Mahdi, and Hussein Jaafar Abdul Karim were
sentenced to life in prison.

Sheikh Ali Salman,  president of Bahrain’s Al Wefaq, the largest Shia political group in the country, told Al Jazeera that the punishments did not fit the crime.

“I believe that these sentences should be revised and the international community must intervene to stop this,” he said.

He added that the proceedings were “unprecedented” and that question marks remain over the conditions the detainees are living in.





Arab Egypt vs African Egypt

24 02 2011

Azad Essa, writing for Al Jazeera, has made an excellent point regarding the uprising’s in African and the Middle East.  In his piece, he points out that what occurred in Tunisia and Egypt and what is now taking place in Libya has been constructed into a story of Arab and Middle Eastern rebellion, even when it says more about the African continent than anywhere else.  It is worth noting that, with the exception of Yemen and Bahrain, the most successful revolutions to have taken place so far have been African nations.

Not only are these uprisings throwing off dictators and autocrats but the people of these post-colonial nations are standing up and establishing an identity which can stand, proudly, despite decades of humiliation by colonial powers and the tyrants who, typically, made themselves out to be saviours.

Anyway, read the full article for an entirely different perspective on what is unfolding.

The African Egypt versus the Arab Egypt

Egypt was suddenly a sexy topic. But, despite the fact that the rich banks of the Nile are sourced from central Africa, the world looked upon the uprising in Egypt solely as a Middle Eastern issue and commentators scrambled to predict what it would mean for the rest of the Arab world and, of course, Israel. Few seemed to care that Egypt was also part of Africa, a continent with a billion people, most living under despotic regimes and suffering economic strife and political suppression just like their Egyptian neighbours.

“Egypt is in Africa. We should not fool about with the attempts of the North to segregate the countries of North Africa from the rest of the continent,” says Firoze Manji, the editor of Pambazuka Online, an advocacy website for social justice in Africa. “Their histories have been intertwined for millennia. Some Egyptians may not feel they are Africans, but that is neither here nor there. They are part of the heritage of the continent.”

And, just like much of the rest of the world, Africans watched events unfold in Cairo with great interest. “There is little doubt that people [in Africa] are watching with enthusiasm what is going on in the Middle East, and drawing inspiration from that for their own struggles,” says Manji.

He argues that globalisation and the accompanying economic liberalisation has created circumstances in which the people of the global South share very similar experiences: “Increasing pauperisation, growing unemployment, declining power to hold their governments to account, declining income from agricultural production, increasing accumulation by dispossession – something that is growing on a vast scale – and increasing willingness of governments to comply with the political and economic wishes of the North. “In that sense, people in Africa recognise the experiences of citizens in the Middle East. There is enormous potential for solidarity to grow out from that. In any case, where does Africa end and the Middle East begin?”





Video footage: Bahrain’s army open fires on protesters

19 02 2011

Care of wlcentral.








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